the week in motion pictures | 9 may 2013

MAY DAY 2013

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DOCUMENTARY

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THE TRIANGLE SHIRTWAIST FIRE

Ric Burns

The American Experience (1999)


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PROFILE

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THE SHOEMAKER

Dustin Cohen | Vimeo

Made in Brooklyn: The Shoemaker

Frank Catalfumo is a 91 year old shoemaker and repairer in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. He first opened the doors to F&C Shoes in 1945 and continues to work five days a week alongside his son Michael. If you’re ever in the area, make sure to stop by the shop and listen to one of Frank’s amazing stories about life in Brooklyn back in the day.

THURSDAY 2 MAY 2013
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ANIMATED SHORT

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THE SEED

Johnny Kelly | Vimeo

A two-minute animated voyage through nature’s life cycle, following the trials and tribulations of a humble apple seed.

The film was kindly funded by Adobe, made using their CS4 range of software. It was produced at Nexus Productions and features a soundtrack by Jape. It was made using a mixture of stop motion papercraft and 2D drawn animation.

See making of here: vimeo.com/2425610

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ANIMATED SHORT

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THE MAKER

Christopher Kezelos | Youtube

A strange creature races against time to make the most important and beautiful creation of his life.

The Maker has screened at over 60 festivals and won 21 awards. For the latest news and updates, visit http://themakerfilm.com.

FRIDAY 3 MAY 2013
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ANIMATED SHORT

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ASTIGMATISMO

Nicolai Troshinsky | Vimeo

“A boy, having lost his glasses, can only see one thing in focus at a time. His sight gets attracted by the sounds that surround him. He will have to explore a blurry world of unknown places and strange characters.”

“Astigmatismo” is a short-film about the feeling of being lost. This feeling is created thanks to an extreme blur effect, leaving only a very tiny space in focus. The focus shifts and moves rhythmically, synchronized with the sounds and the music, revealing a constantly changing landscape.

SATURDAY STREET STYLE | 4 MAY 2013

CHERIE 25 Habillage

MATHEMATIC SAS | Vimeo

SUNDAY FUNNIES | 5 MAY 2013

Sarah Silverman | Fête des Pets
Jash | Youtube

MONDAY 6 MAY 2013
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BRAZIL | TIME LAPSE

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MAR DE LUZ

MOOV | Vimeo

A walk through Fortaleza, one of the most beautiful cities in Brazil! The capital of Ceará grows bathed by the sea of light in Northeast of the country. Follow us on Facebook: facebook.com/imagemoov

TIME OF RIO

MOOV | Vimeo

Time of Rio is a taste of our project about Rio de Janeiro, nature, city and life.
Produced using different image production techniques, like slow motion sequences, Time Lapse, Hyper Lapse, Rails and Motion Controllers.

Music “Oh Wee” by Immortal Beats and “Whispering Through” by Asura

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LABOR | TELEVISION

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AT THE BARRICADES WITH E! WRITERS

Kurt Newman | Jacobin

Nothing scrambles the conventional wisdom on contemporary class politics in the US like a white-collar strike. In our neoliberal era, we’re told that unions might have once been appropriate for the soot-faced and burly proletarians of the 1930s. But since most of those workers have long since disappeared, labor unions — the logic follows — are also no longer necessary.

. . . Eliza Skinner has spent the past year writing jokes for the E! television show Fashion Police. Skinner pens about 200 jokes per episode (almost a full work week’s as far as ‘hours worked’), pitching them at a weekly meeting with the host, Joan Rivers, and the show’s producers. For this, she is paid roughly $500 a week.

What is unique about this arrangement, in comparison with Hollywood norms, is the intensity of the work (the 30-40 hours of work are usually compressed into 3 days), and the meagerness of the compensation. Fashion Police writers’ paychecks say: “Hours worked: 8” every week, regardless of the actual time spent on crafting their contributions to the show. This exploitation is especially galling because the tempo of TV production often requires marathon stretches on the writer’s part: as long as 17 hours in a row, in the case of awards specials. “8 hours. $500,” Skinner marvels. “To write a hit TV show–– one of the top rated shows on the network.”

So on April 13, Skinner and her fellow writers at Fashion Police went on strike.

TUESDAY 7 MAY 2013
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ARCHITECTURE | DOCUMENTARY

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ANTONI GAUDI (1985)

Hiroshi Teshigahara | Criterion Collection

WEDNESDAY 8 MAY 2013
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LIFE

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THIS IS WATER

David Foster Wallace | Open Culture

David Foster Wallace’s 2005 Commencement Speech “This is Water” Visualized in New Short Film
. . . He began with a story: two young fish meet an older fish, who asks them “How’s the water?” The younger fish look at each other and say, “What the hell is water?” Foster Wallace explains the story this way:

The point of the fish story is merely that the most obvious, important realities are often the ones that are hardest to see and talk about. Stated as an English sentence, of course, this is just a banal platitude, but the fact is that in the day to day trenches of adult existence, banal platitudes can have a life or death importance, or so I wish to suggest to you on this dry and lovely morning.

Foster Wallace acknowledges that the anecdote is a cliché of the genre of commencement speeches. He follows it up by challenging, then re-affirming, another cliché: that the purpose of a liberal arts education is to “teach you how to think.” The whole speech is well worth reading.

In the video below, “This is Water,” The Glossary—“fine purveyors of stimulating videograms”—take an abridged version of the original audio recording and set it to a series of provocative images. In their interpretation, Foster Wallace’s speech takes on the kind of middle-class neurosis of David Fincher’s realization of Chuck Palahniuk’s Fight Club.

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TELEVISION

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CRASS ROOTS

Emily Nussbaum | The New Yorker

“This is amazing! It’s like a happy Nuremberg,” a White House aide tells Vice-President Selina Meyer as they rush offstage, having won over another set of voters with Meyer’s pre-baked, if rather surreal, humanizing anecdotes. (“He shook my hand and he said, ‘You don’t remember me—but I am your grandpa.’ ”) Hard to say whether HBO’s “Veep” has changed, or if my mood has simply darkened, but I spent the first few episodes of the show’s second season giggling at its acrid zingers. Some might even come in handy in real-life Washington: “I’m about to enter a national ass-kicking contest. With no legs. And a massive ass.”

. . . This season is so much more effective that it’s practically a master class in how tweaks can transform a series—and in how hard it is to judge a sitcom early on. (Panning a comedy’s first six episodes is like complaining that a newborn has insufficient neck strength.) To put it in the most banal, notes-from-the-network sort of way, in “Veep” ’s first season the stakes were too low.

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DESIGN

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SAUL BASS GOOGLE DOODLE

OBlog | Design Observer

Today, Saul Bass would have turned 93. To celebrate his prolific career, Google commissioned one of the more sublime “Doodles” yet. Designer/director Matt Cruickshank visually references nearly a dozen classic Bass film title sequences and film posters, from Psycho to Spartacus to North by Northwest.

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FILM SHORT

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ODE TO OCTAVIA PART 12 (SPARKLES) . . . THE RECOLLECTIONS OF THE WRAITH

The Black Constellation | Vimeo | via Believer Mag Tumblr

A short film presented by The Black Constellation
Part twelve of thirteen of the Ode to Octavia Series

Presented initially during Moment Magnitude at the Frye Art Museum

Conceived, Written and Directed by Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes

Last week’s collection can be found here.
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